International Corporate Accountability Roundtable

We influence global norms.

 

LEAD STAFF: CINDY WOODS
aDVISORS: ANITA RAMASASTRY, MARK TAYLOR, OLIVIER DE SCHUTTER

 
 

Rules that dictate social and economic policy considerations are often developed at the international level. To ensure economies respect the rights of all people, not just powerful corporations, global governance processes must take into account greater consideration of human rights issues.

We see the value in utilizing a multitude of global governance bodies to push governments to make and support stronger commitments in relation to promoting and protecting human rights against corporate interests, including in global supply chains. 

We then work to ensure that these norms and standards are implemented at the national level.

 


General Updates

UNITED NATIONS GUIDING PRINCIPLES ON BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

The United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (“Guiding Principles”) which were unanimously endorsed by the U.N. Human Rights Council in June 2011, affirm that business enterprises have a responsibility respect human rights, and that States have a duty to ensure that they do so.  The Guiding Principles make clear that “the responsibility of business enterprises to respect human rights refers to internationally proclaimed human rights – understood as those expressed in the International Bill of Human Rights and the principles concerning fundamental rights set out in the International Labor Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.”  The Guiding Principles also clarify that the duty to protect against human rights abuses requires States to take “appropriate steps to prevent, investigate, punish and redress such abuse through effective policies, legislation, regulation and adjudication.”